. . . of Surveillance of the University of Surveillance of the . . .

Dipping back into the archive once more, this time to the “Media in Transition 8” conference held at MIT in 2013. I began this talk with a “joke” intro that (shamelessly) I have used more than once. Partly, because it almost always gets a good laugh. But mostly because, in …

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Full circle

Let’s end 2022 more or less where it began, shall we? Back then, I offered a tease of a podcast in the making (co-created with Giulia Pelillo-Hestermeyer). At the time, that podcast was more virtual than real. A few hours of unedited audio. A website with a mostly unpopulated WordPress …

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Sweet dreams

One of my favorite ever conference “presentations” was something that began as a joke. Greg Seigworth (and old friend from grad school) was organizing a conference on affect, and had included a specific request in the call for papers to “Wreck The Format” (WTF) with non-traditional ways of engaging with …

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What next?

I did a thing today (and yesterday too, but yesterday’s thing can wait until next week to show up here) as part of the long-awaited, much-missed “Crossroads in Cultural Studies” conference that was supposed to happen in person in Lisbon in 2020 but . . . well, you know what …

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Suspicious Minds

1997 was the 20th anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death. It was also the year after Elvis After Elvis was published. And so I found myself talking about Elvis a lot that year. In August, I gave one version of the talk below in Memphis, at the third (and also, I …

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Achieving Critical Mass

Another dip into the archive of old conference papers. This time, reaching back to the National Communication Association conference in Seattle in November 2000. There are some early versions of arguments here that eventually found there way into Why Cultural Studies? There’s a brief reference to a book project with …

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Being (un)disciplined

In November 2004, I was part of a spotlight panel — “With Eyes Wide Open: Moving and Looking, Evaluating Critical Cultural Studies” — at the annual conference of the National Communication Association in Chicago. It was a crowded panel — 6 people giving short position papers, 6 more people responding …

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